• The Urban Tantra Post-Pandemic Process—Step 3

    Step 3: Find Your Superpower.

         We all have Superpowers. While we can easily name and describe other people’s superpowers, it can be difficult to identify and name our own. That’s partially because we take our superpowers for granted, but it’s also because bragging about how great and talented and kind we are is generally considered an super-uncool thing to do.

         I’ll bet that the pandemic revealed at least one superpower you didn’t know you had. Maybe it was patience, or perseverance, or the ability to give strength and hope to others. This newly recognized superpower can be an important insight in your Post Pandemic Process.

         Let’s have a Brag Festival. In the comments below, please tell us one of your Superpowers. (Extra brag points if you can name one discovered during the pandemic.) If you can’t think of one, ask a friend or family member to tell you the one they see in you. If you can think of several, go for it—brag away!

         Ready, set…..BRAG!

         I’ll go first. Living through this last pandemic reminded me that I am really good at long-haul endurance projects. Linda Montano calls it Art/Life performance art. I excel at it.

  • The Urban Tantra Post-Pandemic Process—Step 2

    Step 2: Forgive Yourself.
         I am forgiving myself for everything I did not accomplish last year while everyone else (I imagine) was baking sourdough, remodeling their house, writing a book and learning to speak Italian.

         Whatever you and I did or did not do was perfect because we stayed alive. That was our only job. We don’t have to make amends to ourselves or work harder now to make up for all the things we imagine we should have done.

         I have am forgiving myself for…
    • not having read all the books
    • not having cleaned out the basement, the drawers and the garage
    • not having prepared a complete archive of my work
    • not having written an updated version of a previous book
    • not having driven more rescue dog transports
    • not having stayed in touch (or even gotten back to) all the people who reached out to me during the pandemic
    • not having lost weight
    • not having worked harder, longer or faster
    • [This list is still in progress…]
         How about you? What can you forgive yourself for?
    May be an image of sky, body of water and text
  • The Post-Pandemic Summer of Love

         Fifteen months ago, a client told me that one of their intentions was to get ready for the “Summer of Love” they they suspected would follow all the quarantines, lockdowns and social distancing. Well, for some of us that Summer of Love might be starting now, or will be starting later this summer of 2021. Are you ready?Honestly, I am not sure I am. I don’t want to unconsciously jump back into “life as normal.” I want time to discover who I am and how this pandemic has transformed me.
         I am in the process of re-entry. While I am enjoying the summer sun and the possibilities of returning to art and performance and music and group erotics, I want to be mindful. So much has changed. Who am I now and what do I want?

    This is the first in a series of posts that I call the Urban Tantra Post-Pandemic-Process. Basically, it’s my process as I find my way out of the pandemic and into this new chapter of life. I’m sharing it to start a conversation with like-minded folks about how we re-enter the transformed world with love, kindness, sensuality and purpose.

         I discovered Tantra during the AIDS crisis which is the only other pandemic I have lived through. What appealed to me most about Tantra—then and now—is the invitation to experience everything life throws at you—from the ecstatic to the terrifying, as deeply, consciously and fully as possible. When you walk through the fire of a situation and come out the other side, you are transformed, purified and forged into something stronger and finer. Each one of these walks through the fire of earthly existence brings you one more little slice of enlightenment.
         Here is Step #1 of the Urban Tantra Post-Pandemic-Process:
    Reflect/Assess: What did you like (or even love) about the Pandemic Year? What did you loathe?
    Here are some of my Likes,/Loves and Loathes:
    • I loved how as the world got slower nature seemed to move faster. I loved being in one place for an entire year and observing the minute details of how the seasons changed.
    • I loved that theatres around the world opened their archives and put them online. I saw brilliant pieces of theater that I never would have been able to see in person.
    • I loved the creative challenge of teaching embodied practices online. I loved teaching for audiences from all over the world at the same time.
    • I loved not being in airports.
    • I loved the freedom of not having to dash all over the city. I realized how much time I spent just getting from place to place.
    • I loathed not being able to share smiles with random people on the street.
    • I loathed not being able to go to Camp Crucible and other large erotic events.I loathed masks. They made my nose run and then I would sneeze a lot and that made people really nervous.
    How about you? What did you like/love and loathe?
  • Ecstatic Resilience

    It’s been One. Whole. Year. Four seasons have passed. Birthdays, anniversaries, graduations, weddings, and funerals have all gone uncelebrated, or celebrated with a handful of people carefully spaced two metres apart, or alone in front of a screen. We’re tired, worn down, depressed. Even the exceedingly creative ways we’ve discovered to gather together or create some delight in our lives now feels disappointing—kinda like we’re living half-lives. It sucks. But for the friends, families, and colleagues of more than 2.5 million people around the world who have died in this pandemic, these are all mere inconveniences in comparison to their profound grief.

    So, how I dare I talk about ecstatic anything, right? It’s like hearing someone rave about the banquet they attended last year while now all the grocery stores are closed and you don’t even have the makings of a sandwich. But stay with me, okay? I want to talk about a particularly timely flavor of ecstatic experience—Ecstatic Resilience.

    My concept of an ecstatic life does not demand that I walk around in a constant state of bliss.  My concept of resilience does not mean that I never feel defeated. Ecstatic Resilience means that I have the ability to access ecstatic moments when I want them, and that my regular practice of creating ecstatic experiences makes me more resilient. Even when things are difficult, painful, and upsetting, I know that I will ultimately be able to use the elements of whatever is happening to create an ecstatic experience, if not now, then in the reasonably near future. For me, living an ecstatic life means looking upon ecstasy as a spiritual practice.

    The way I see at it, we all have a choice right now. We can tough out the next several months (or more), gritting our teeth and getting more and more numb and resentful. Or we can embrace some tools for ecstatic living that we can use to make life more joyful right now, and prepare ourselves for lives filled with joy, connection and ecstasy when the pandemic has passed.

    Here are some tools that have been working for me. I know that some of you are going through extraordinary challenges right now and all of these will not be available/possible for everyone. Just try the ones that feel appropriate or adapt them to suit your circumstances.

    Radically accept—everything. Radical acceptance is the practice of accepting things as they are with no expectation that they will ever change. Of course, all things change all the time, but by accepting things as they are with no expectations, and releasing your attempts to change them,  almost any situation can be turned into an experience that—if not ecstatic in itself—can lead to a place of peace and no regrets, both of which contribute to an ecstatic life. Radical acceptance also provides the opportunity to find creative and ecstatic alternatives to the situation, and it paves the way for positive change.

    Dissolve the boundary between your body and nature. Whether you live in a big city, a small town, or in the country, take a moment each day to establish a connection to a natural element. This could be as simple as taking a walk in which you lose yourself in the feeling of the sun on your skin, or feel yourself absorbed into the blue of the sky. You could hug a tree, listen intently to the song of a bird, or even spend quality time with your dog. A key aspect of ecstatic resilience is feeling connected to all that is. Consciously practicing this connection on a daily basis keeps that ecstatic channel open, even while isolating.

    Live what you love. This is hardly a new maxim, but it’s essential to an ecstatic life. Do as much of what you love as you possibly can. Do as little as you must of anything you don’t like. The more you commit to what you love, the easier it is to let the rest be handled by someone else who enjoys it more. Pay attention to your intuitive energy meter. Remember to ask yourself: Do I feel an energy gain or an energy drain in this situation, or around this person? Eliminate or minimize your exposure to anything or anyone that drains your energy. Embrace that which feeds you.

    Whatever you’re doing—do it whole-heartedly. Do not hold back. Give yourself over completely. Be bigger than you think you are. Be more than you’ve ever been. Be too much. Yes, even on Zoom.

    Embrace and celebrate your inner teenager. What was your passion at age 13? Or age 16? How did you pursue that passion? What was your most compelling reason for pursuing this passion? How did you behave if people told you that your passion was wrong, silly, or a waste of time? Revisit your most ecstatic, stubborn, passionate, activist years. Take notes. See your inner teenager as a vital part of your authentic adult self.

    Go to the edge. Fall off. See what’s there. Start a love affair with your own fear. Imagine your fear as your best friend. Throw a virtual fear party. Invite all your friends and all their fears. Make a fear playlist and dance with your fears.

    Seize the moment—and stay in it. Slow down! Spend as much time in each present moment as you can. Time is such wibbly-wobbly stuff these days. Create meditative moments in varied areas of your life and stretch each one to its fullest. See how much ecstasy you can savor in each moment of the day.

    Live in amazement. I am consistently amazed at life in all its weird and wacky permutations. I am amazed by the infinite kindness and courage of humanity. I am amazed by how much I’ve learned over the years. I’m amazed that I’m surviving the second plague of my lifetime. I’m amazed by how little I know and how much I learn every single day.  Make a list of what amazes you.

    Would you like some help and support strengthening your Ecstatic Resilience? Would you like to learn some powerful, practical, and fun ecstatic exercises that you can enjoy both now and when we can be with others again? Would you like some techniques to expand your sexual pleasure, even and especially if your only sex partner is yourself? Would you like to sit in a virtual circle with others who want the same things you do? Join me for my four-part series beginning 10 March 2021—Urban Tantra: Sacred Sex for the Twenty-First Century—Online via Zoom in partnership with The New York Open Center  You can register for the whole series or take individual classes:
    10 March: Ecstatic Breathwork
    31 March: Creating Tantric Connections
    21 April: Sex Magic
    12 May: Taking Erotic Risks

  • Some Resources For These Times—Including The Rockettes!

    I began my Tantric practice many years ago during the AIDS pandemic. I was looking for a spiritual practice that was body and sex positive, that could support me in the huge emotional shifts I was going through, and that provided a sense of healing, purpose and peace. Urban Tantra was born out of both the times I was living in and what I learned from my own personal Tantric practices in those times. It has continued to grow and evolve over the years as the Urban Tantra community has grown exponentially, both geographically and intersectionally. Each and every person who has a connection to Urban Tantra has contributed to what it is now, and what it will become next.

    Like you, I am profoundly affected by the worldwide pandemic that we are all living through. We each have our individual emotional and physical reactions to our new reality. We are also a participant in a global collective human experience.

    I have no magic answers for these times. Truthfully, I’m not looking for answers right now—I’m searching for the right questions. For me, answers are useless if they aren’t attached to the right questions. This week, the questions were “How can I help my friends and family who are particularly vulnerable at this time?” and “How can I soothe and center myself while feeling useful?” The answers? I’m sitting at my sewing machine making face masks and preparing them for mailing. And writing this email to you. That’s this week. Next week the questions will be different and so will the answers.

    This week I have been inspired, soothed, and motivated by a few resources I think you might find helpful. As the weeks go by, I’ll continue to pass along things that might provide long or short term answers to our unfolding questions.

    With Love and Lots of Breath,

    Barbara

    Thought for the Week:
    (Thanks to Shelley Dungan of the Sacred Center in Portsmouth, RI)

    Embrace the Pause

    Read/Listen:

    Why You Should Ignore All That Coronavirus-Inspired Productivity Pressure

    … “On the other side of this journey of acceptance are hope and resilience. We will know that we can do this, even if our struggles continue for years. We will be creative and responsive, and will find light in all the nooks and crannies. We will learn new recipes and make unusual friends. We will have projects we cannot imagine today, and will inspire students we have not yet met. And we will help each other. No matter what happens next, together, we will be blessed and ready to serve.”

    Pema Chodron’s Fail, Fail Again, Fail Better: Wise Advice for Leaning into the Unknown

    Dance/Move:

    A free dance class with Debbie Allen.
    Debbie Allen was one of the great Broadway dancers, and one of the stars of the TV show Fame in the 1980’s. She’s now a director of Grey’s Anatomy and one of its stars. She also runs a dance academy in Los Angeles. She is teaching a series of dance classes via Instagram. No matter your age or level of fitness, you can dance like a pro with Debbie.

    The Radio City Rockettes have just started Instagram dance classes!

    Breathe:

    This is a great time for a Breath and Energy Orgasm! Download this mp3 and I’ll guide you through one.